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Spirulina Applications

Applications of Spirulina


Spirulina spp. and its processing products are employed in agriculture, food industry, pharmaceutics, perfumery and medicine. Spirulina has several pharmacological activities such as antimicrobial (including antiviral and antibacterial), anticancer, metalloprotective (prevention of heavy-metal poisoning against Cd, Pb, Fe, Hg), as well as immunostimulant and antioxidant effects due to its rich content of protein, polysaccharide, lipid, essential amino and fatty acids, dietary minerals and vitamins.1

The nutritional profile of Spirulina is very effective when combined with a healthy and balanced diet as part of a preventive strategy for self-care. 1 kg of Spirulina has the same nutrients found in about 1,000 kgs of assorted vegetables. Some of the key health benefits of using Spirulina are:

Boosts the immune system Controls appetite
Improve digestion Keeps a tab on cardiovascular function
Reduce fatigue Helps proper liver and kidney functioning
Build endurance Reduces inflammation and allergies
Detoxifier - cleanses the body Boosts energy levels
Spirulina is also believed to control ailments such as AIDS/HIV, arthritis, athletic nutrition, enhancing natural cleansing and detoxification, supporting cardiovascular function and healthy cholesterol, strengthening the immune system, improving gastrointestinal and digestive health, reducing cancer risks with antioxidant protection, general and long term health.

Source: Cyanotech Corporation

1http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23544470

Spirulina Introduction

    Spirulina is a human and animal food or nutritional supplement made primarily from two species of cyanobacteria: Arthrospira platensis and Arthrospira maxima.

Spirulina Production

"Spirulina ( Arthospira sp) used for the production of single" cell protein. The commercial producers of Spirulina are located in the United States, Thailand, India, Taiwan, China, Pakistan, Burma and Chile.

Spirulina Composition

    Spirulina contains about 60% (51-71%) protein of its dry weight. The protein content varies by 10-15% according to the time of harvesting in relation to daylight.

Cultivation and Growth Requirements

"The optimum temperature for growth is 35oC, but above 38oC spirulina is in danger. Growth only takes place in light (photosynthesis), but illumination 24 hours a day is not recommended.

Spirulina – Facts & Factoids

"Spirulina is not considered to be a reliable source of Vitamin B12. The standard B12 assay, using Lactobacillus leichmannii, shows spirulina to be a minimal source of bioavailable vitamin B12.

Spirulina – Market

"Spirulina is now commercially available in tablet or powder form. During 1970-1980, at the time when spirulina was launched on the market, the market for food supplements was not organised and regulated as is the case today.

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